WorkForce Training Series

Posted in Uncategorized on February 3rd, 2011 by admin – Be the first to comment

Coming soon new series and new topics.

WorkForce Training Series January – June 2013

Universal Lesson Planning Tools ©

Designing Developmentally Appropriate Infant Toddler Curriculum
For Center Based – Home Based and Play Groups

Receive Year’s Worth – FREE – Fully Loaded Lesson Plans
Also Available for Purchase Online

One Year – 12 Monthly Lesson Plans – 3 Age Groups
Young Infants: 0-12 Months
Mobile Toddlers: 12-24 Months
Older Toddlers: 24-36 Months

 

Universal Universal Lesson Planning Tools ©

Developed and Presented by Patricia A Hillman
Infant Toddler Trainer @ Zero To Three:
National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families
Fully Certified Trainer: WestEd Program for Infant Toddler Care (PITC)

ZeroToFiveConsulting.com

Before & After

Posted in Uncategorized on February 2nd, 2011 by admin – Be the first to comment

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Before

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After

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Get a head start in setting up:
Developmentally and age appropriate Infant Toddler Interest Areas, materials and activities.
with Pat Hillman’s  Universal Lesson Planning Tool

Universal Lesson Planning Tools

Posted in Lesson Planning Tool on September 30th, 2010 by gary – Be the first to comment

As seen in Pat Hillman’s Presentations.
One Year | 12 Monthly Lesson Plans | 3 Age Groups
Infant (0 – 12 Months) | Toddler (12 – 24 Months) | Older Toddler (24 – 36 Months)

36 Monthly Lesson Planning Tools
(Free Shipping)

Choose to Receive:

Music: An Early Literacy Boost for Little Ones

Posted in Best Practices on November 13th, 2009 by LindaKimura – Be the first to comment

Music is an important form of communication for little ones. Parents’ lullabies teach babies a sense of trust and love that helps them learn that life is safe and comforting. Music teaches toddlers that the world is a fun and exciting place to live.   When little ones kick their legs, wave their arms, babble, and smile while parents sing to them, they are giving important cues to their parents. Adults who respond by smiling back and continuing to sing or chant are telling them, “We understand that you like this, and we are going to do it some more just for you.” 

THE SOUNDS OF LANGUAGE
Children learn the sounds of language when they are exposed to easy, repetitive songs, chants and nursery rhymes.  For example, “Rain, Rain Go Away” has a simple three-note range. Why is this important? Children learn how language is structured when adults talk, read, and sing to them and encourage them to talk. Children instinctively listen to music and try to identify familiar melodies and rhythms, just as early readers look for words that sound alike, have patterns, or rhyme (Jalongo & Ribblet, 1997).

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Babies recognize familiar melodies before they understand the meanings of words, and they use their cooing and babbling as musical conversation before they can talk. (Mangione, 1995b).  As they grow, children have fun discovering how to make many different sounds and then using those sounds to pretend (such as talking for a stuffed animal). When parents responds to this, children start to learn turn- taking as well as cause and effect (“I made my little cow say moooooo, please. I think that means pet me, please, and then Mommy came over and petted my little cow.”).
(The rest of the article will be added in a later blog post)

©Linda Kimura, MA “The Ukulele Baby Lady” November 2004

Dr. Bruce Perry on Play

Posted in Uncategorized on November 8th, 2009 by LindaKimura – 2 Comments

What do Dr. Bruce Perry and his colleagues say about play?

“Play and exploration are crucial activities for young children. They help the child’s brain develop in optimal ways. Child sensitive spaces, semi-structured activities and opportunities for exploration are safe, nurturing and enriched in developmentally appropriate stimulation should be the core elements of all child-focused programs. Play and exploration grow the brain – healthy play and exploration grows healthy brains.

Through play, a child’s sense of who she is can become more defined and integrated. As she learns about herself and the world, she acquires a wide range of important developmental, social, and cognitive skills, as well as positive inner traits, that help form the basis for happiness, productivity and a healthy future. Play-related skill building tracks with neurodevelopment. As described above, the brain organizes from the bottom to the top

Gross motor skills, such as walking, kicking, or skipping, can be enhanced when a toddler pushes a toy grocery cart or an older child jumps rope. When a young child kicks a ball across the room, she is practicing coordination by balancing on one foot to kick with the other. She is additionally developing larger muscle control, tone and flexibility, qualities that may help her score the winning goal when she is old enough to play soccer.

Children can develop advanced fine motor and manipulation skills while playing as they use their fingers to build and color a sign for a backyard tree house. When throwing and catching a ball, they are practicing hand-eye coordination and their ability to grasp. They are even developing the muscle control and coordination needed to one day write a letter to a friend, as they scribble with a pencil on paper.

Children have opportunities to enhance their language skills through play by talking and singing with other children. A child’s interactions with and repetition of his playmates help him master the semantics of language as he participates in spontaneous rhyming and word play. While having fun, he increases his play-related speech, his sentence length, and his vocabulary.

The child’s cognitive, or mental, abilities can also be enhanced by play. A child’s play often involves physical and mental trial and error, problem-solving tasks, and an ability to discriminate between relevant and irrelevant information. Play requires the child to make choices and direct activities and often involves strategizing, or planning, to reach a goal. Through pleasurable play, children often become motivated and perseverant, qualities that frequently may later translate into the classroom.

While enjoying their play, children can acquire a wide range of interpersonal/social skills, ranging from communication to cooperation. When children argue about who stepped “out of bounds” and agree upon a “do over,” they are learning how to negotiate, compromise and work together. They are learning about teamwork when they huddle together and decide how they will position themselves for the next shot. The child gains an understanding about those around him and may become more empathetic and less egocentric. When playing with peers, children are developing a learning system of social rules, including ways to control themselves and tolerate their frustrations in a social setting.

Children have opportunities to enhance their language skills through play by talking and singing with other children. A child’s interactions with and repetition of his playmates help him master the semantics of language as he participates in spontaneous rhyming and word play. While having fun, he increases his play-related speech, his sentence length, and his vocabulary.

The child’s cognitive, or mental, abilities can also be enhanced by play. A child’s play often involves physical and mental trial and error, problem-solving tasks, and an ability to discriminate between relevant and irrelevant information. Play requires the child to make choices and direct activities and often involves strategizing, or planning, to reach a goal. Through pleasurable play, children often become motivated and perseverant, qualities that frequently may later translate into the classroom.

While enjoying their play, children can acquire a wide range of interpersonal/social skills, ranging from communication to cooperation. When children argue about who stepped “out of bounds” and agree upon a “do over,” they are learning how to negotiate, compromise and work together. They are learning about teamwork when they huddle together and decide how they will position themselves for the next shot. The child gains an understanding about those around him and may become more empathetic and less egocentric. When playing with peers, children are developing a learning system of social rules, including ways to control themselves and tolerate their frustrations in a social setting.”

For more information, visit  http://www.ChildTrauma.org   or    http://Scholastic.com/bruceperrry